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Professional Development Experiences for Educators

by: MUN

News Date:

Feb 7, 2013

During the winter semester of the 2012/2013 academic year Distance Education, Learning and Teaching Support (DELTS) will be offering several professional development experiences highlighting teaching practice and current issues in teaching and learning. These professional development experiences are open to faculty, per course instructors, instructional staff, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows.

The professional development will be offered in four streams and delivered in a blended format; face-to-face sessions and online experiences; to help participants maintain continuity throughout the stream if they choose to do so.

Participants can take part in just one or all of the learning experiences offered in a stream, and they can pick and choose from the various learning experiences in multiple streams in order to meet their professional development needs.

The four streams being offered are:

  1. Stream I — Learner-centred Design
  2. Stream II – Preparing a Teaching Dossier
  3. Stream III – Technology and the Learning Environment
  4. Stream IV – Who are our Students?

A description and key topics for each stream is list below:

Stream I – Learner-centred Design

How can instructors use learner-centered design in practice to promote engagement and enhance student learning?
 
Though a series of online modules, forums, blended learning activities, and face-to-face sessions participants will examine learner-centered principles and course design. They will explore a variety of strategies to incorporate learner-centered processes and practices into new and existing courses.
 
This series is designed using learner-centered design principles and will include topics such as: the characteristics of student-centered learning; five steps to incorporating learner-center design into your course; creating a learner-centered syllabus; designing teaching and learning activities, assessment, and feedback practices that support a learner-centered approach; classroom activities for the blended learning classroom; course and program design that support learner-centered goals for optimal academic achievement.

After completing the learning experiences in this stream participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the characteristics of student-centered learning
  2. Complete the course analysis and design phases of the course development life cycle with the learner in mind
  3. Design specific learning components with focus on the learner
  4. Define and create a learner-centered course syllabus to provide essential information and promote learning
  5. Select and use technology that helps students meet the course outcomes and objectives

Experience I

Title: Introduction to Learner-Centered Course Design

Description: How can instructors use learner-centered course design principles to promote engagement and optimize student learning?

This online facilitated course is an introduction to the concepts of Learner-centered Course Design. Participants will explore a variety of strategies to incorporate learner-centered processes and practices into new and existing courses.

This course is designed using learner-centered design principles and will include topics such as: the characteristics of student-centered learning; creating a learner-centered syllabus; and designing teaching and learning activities, assessment, and feedback practices that support a learner-centered approach for optimal academic achievement.

The course is self-paced, allowing participants to work through the topics and complete the learning activities at a pace and time that meets their needs and schedule. The course facilitators will be available through email and the Discussion Forums and will review and provide feedback on completed activities. The course completion period is two weeks with an estimated four to six total hours spent (this can vary depending on individual needs). This will provide some structure while allowing time to complete the activities and apply the concepts to new or existing courses. You will have access to the course for your reference beyond the two week time frame.

Facilitators: Denise Carew and John Hoben, DELTS

Date and Time: Online – Monday, February 18, 2013 (two week asynchronous experience)

To register contact Arlene Power at instrdev@mun.ca indicating your name, department, telephone number, email address, your affiliation with the university, and the professional development experience for which you would like to register.

Stream II – Preparing a Teaching Dossier

This series of learning experiences is offered in a blended format with three face-to-face sessions, online resources and activities, and ongoing feedback and support in the preparation of a teaching dossier.

A teaching dossier is one of the documents that make up an academic file. Its purpose is to provide “a strong context and solid documentary materials” about teaching effectiveness for teaching development and career advancement (Diamond, 2002). Participants will have opportunities to discuss the qualities of good teaching and will complete a draft of their teaching dossier which will consist of: a statement of teaching philosophy and goals; an account of teaching responsibility; a description of teaching strengths and accomplishments; and a collection of artifacts to support the claims made about teaching practice and skill.

After completing the learning experiences in this stream participants should be able to:

Value the teaching dossier as a tool for teaching improvement and career advancement
Be confident about their ability to accurately reflect their teaching practice in a teaching dossier
Reflect on their teaching to identify goals, strengths, accomplishments and areas for development
Compile evidence of their teaching skill
Write a narrative that is reflective, self-critical, and that provides a context for the evidence complied

Experience I

Title: Introduction to a Teaching Dossier

Description: Participants will be asked to complete a short introductory module in Desire2Learn (D2L) prior to attending the face-to-face session. An email providing instructions about access to the module will be sent to all registrants on February 20th. In the face-to-face session we will review the purpose of a teaching dossier, its content, and the process involved in preparing a dossier. We will discuss the properties of good teaching and reflect on personal teaching goals and strengths. A suggested framework for your dossier will be presented and you will be introduced to D2L’s ePortfolio as one option for collecting and presenting evidence of your teaching effectiveness.

Facilitator: Allyson Hajek, DELTS

Date and Time: Online Module – available Wednesday, February 20, 2013
Face-to-face Session – Wednesday, February 27, 2013, 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Location: ED 2030B (Education Building)

To register contact Arlene Power at instrdev@mun.ca indicating your name, department, telephone number, email address, your affiliation with the university, and professional development experience for which you would like to register.

Stream III – Technology and the Learning Environment

This professional development series will explore the use of technology by post-secondary instructors and its impact on the learning environment. The series will use a variety of modes of delivery: online, blended, self-paced and face-to-face, to allow participants to explore themes related to teaching with technology including: technologies for blended learning, information literacy, teaching large classes with technology, teacher presence and E-Learning, and using technological tools to enhance student engagement.  This unifying focus will give instructors, a clear understanding of the effects of technological integration in the classroom as a means of enhancing student learning.

After completing the learning experiences in this stream participants should be able to:

Outline the principles of technology assisted teaching and blended models of learning
Describe how technology can enhance student engagement and learning;
Define technological literacy and describe its role in enhancing teacher-student dialogue
Integrating technology with student-centered approaches of teaching and learning;
Describe student perspectives on technology as a tool for promoting student-teacher engagement.
Experience I

Title: Let’s Talk Teaching with Technology

Description: Join us for a roundtable discussion with faculty and academic staff who are experienced with or have interest in effectively using technology in their teaching. The goal of the discussion is to raise awareness of the tools that are readily available to the university community, and to provide attendees with the opportunity to showcase some of the innovative ways they are already using technology in their teaching. Come and engage us about technologies you’re interested in using, or share your experiences so others can learn from your success.

Facilitators: Colleen Collett and John Hoben, DELTS

Date and Time: Thursday, March 7, 2013, from 12:00 noon to 1:30 p.m.

Location: ED 2030B (Education Building)

To register contact Arlene Power at instrdev@mun.ca indicating your name, department, telephone number, email address, your affiliation with the university, and professional development experience for which you would like to register.

Stream IV – Who are our students?

Students at Memorial University and indeed across all university and college campuses are changing. They are presenting with complex social, emotional and learning needs. This series of learning experiences focuses on several aspects of the diverse and ever changing needs of Memorial University students. Specifically, this stream will examine the diverse demographic make-up of the current student body, the use of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) as a way to allow greater numbers of students’ access to Memorial’s programs, and examine the increasing prevalence of mental health diagnoses of today’s student.

After completing the learning experiences in this stream participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the changing demographics of today’s university students
  2. Outline the implications of the changing demographics on a student’s university experience
  3. Describe and apply the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) in the post-secondary setting
  4. Reflect on how the principles of Universal Design for Instruction (UDL) can be implemented at the classroom level, and beyond to assist students with diverse learning needs
  5. Discuss the implications of the increased rate of mental health diagnoses of today’s university student
  6. Describe the impact of mental health diagnoses and other diagnosed exceptionalities in university students’ university experiences

Experience I

Title: Universal Design for Learning: An introduction to UDL in Post-Secondary Education

Description: This face-to-face learning experience will introduce the concept of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and it’s many applications in post-secondary education. This experience will give participants opportunities to explore the concepts of UDL and will allow them a chance to reflect on and discuss their own uses of UDL.

Facilitators: Jason Geary, DELTS and Gabrielle Young, Faculty of Education

Date and Time: Wednesday, February 20, 2013, from 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Location: ED 2030B (Education Building)

To register contact Arlene Power at instrdev@mun.ca indicating your name, department, telephone number, email address, your affiliation with the university, and professional development experience for which you would like to register.

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